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Calip Recieves New R21 to Study Outcomes in Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity

Gregory Calip, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes, and Policy

Gregory Calip, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes, and Policy

Gregory Calip, PharmD, MPH, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy and an affiliate in the Center for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomic Research has received a new R21 grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and National Cancer Institute (NIH, NHLBI/NCI) through the funding opportunity announcement “Improving Outcomes in Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity” in the amount of $414,000 over two years. The title of the project is “Risk of venous thromboembolism following diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma: differences by race”. Strategies to minimize the risk of cancer treatment-related  cardiotoxicity are needed to keep pace with the evolving highly effective treatments for patients with multiple myeloma. This research will examine the comparative safety of multiple myeloma treatments with respect to treatment-related venous thromboembolism and determine differences in long-term risk by racial groups in the United States.

Co-Investigators from the College of Pharmacy include Glen Schumock, PharmD, MBA, Ph.D., Professor, and Edith Nutescu, PharmD, MS CTS. Brian Chiu, Ph.D., from The University of Chicago, Department of Public Health Sciences is also a collaborator and Co-Investigator.

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